Happy Christmas from The English Contractor!

 

Craig Russell moved to Cincinnati from the Black Country in England 8 years ago, introducing us all to his slang words, British foods and a regular tea time in the office.  Just when we think we’re getting a handle on what it’s like to be an ex-pat here in Ohio, Craig introduces us to a slew of new traditions, including how the English celebrate Christmas. While we have the same reason for the season, there are some pretty distinct differences. We thought we’d pass our learnings along to you. 

 

American Tradition

Nothing quite says Christmas like a festive beverage. You might enjoy some traditional eggnog. Or a warm mug of cider.


English Tradition

Our UK counterparts, we have learned, a more likely to imbibe with a glass of wassail, which is similar to a mulled wine. As part of the tradition for Twelfth Night, in early January, revelers would go “wassailing,” where they would go door to door, mugs in hand, toasting their friends.


American Tradition

The holidays are all about the desserts. Almost anything goes, but it’s hard to find a holiday meal that doesn’t have a traditional pumpkin or pecan pie and a batch of Christmas cookies. 


English Tradition

Christmas pudding is the traditional dessert, although it has more of the consistency of a fruitcake. Often, coins are hidden inside as a special surprise. You might enjoy a mince meat pie, which from what we understand, doesn’t include any meat at all, but a mixture of spices and dried fruits.


American Tradition

Santa Claus is the man of the hour. You know him. Red suit, white beard, jolly as all get out. 


English Tradition

He’s called Father Christmas in the UK. And this fellow doesn’t even live in the North Pole. Instead Father Christmas lives in Lapland, Finland.


American Tradition

Merry Christmas. Happy Holidays. Maybe even a Feliz Navidad. But either way you slice it, that’s how we send our greetings for the season.


English Tradition

The English are famous for their slang. They might wish you a Happy Christmas, but Christmas is sometimes shortened to Chrimbo. And they may throw some rhyming words in the mix as well to celebrate the holiday with cockney slang. You may have heard an English person use the words “apples and pears” in place of stairs. During this holiday season, the word “believe” may be substituted for “Christmas Eve,” for example, “Do you Christmas Eve it? I have more gifts to wrap!” 


No matter how you say it, all of us at the English Contractor wish you the happiest of holidays! We look forward to working with you in 2019!

 
aaron friesen